Tag Archives: Patient assistance program

insulin syringe

Humulin Manufacturer Coupon 2019

Are you looking for the best ways to save on your Humulin prescription? At the Rx Helper, we help Americans save thousands of dollars on their Humilin every year: much more when compared to the average savings of the Humulin Manufacturer Coupon 2019. We bring together health care providers, drug manufacturers, community groups, and patient advocacy organizations to help qualifying uninsured and under-insured Americans pay for their life-saving medications. We were founded on the belief that no one should have to choose whether or not to pay for their mortgage or their prescription bills. Read on to find out more useful information about Humulin, the possible side effects, what it treats, and how to save hundreds of dollars on this expensive medication.

What is Humulin? What is the Cost of Humulin? 

A single vial of 10ml Humulin R 100 units/ml generally costs $100-$160 a vial: and that includes the manufacturer’s coupon! This is a high price to pay this short-acting type of insulin. Essentially, insulin helps keep the body’s blood levels in check in patients who suffer from diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2. Sine there is no generic equivalent for Humulin, uninsured Americans are forced to pay for the retail price out-of-pocket.

What is Insulin?

Insulin is a natural human hormone that is typically produced in the pancreas in healthy individuals. Insulin helps regulate the amount of blood sugar (glucose) in the body. Your body utilizes insulin to either utilize glucose from food for energy or to store sugar for future use. Insulin prevents blood sugar levels from dropping or rising to dangerous levels.

In type 1 diabetes, patients cannot make insulin themselves, as beta cells have attacked and damaged their pancreas. In this case, insulin injection is a necessary and life-saving treatment for this type of diabetes. Humulin is a rapid-acting insulin, meaning it starts to work in 15 minutes after the injection. The medication reaches full-force at 1 hour and then continues to provide treatment for another 2- 4 hours. In addition to long-acting insulin, these two medications are typically taken before a meal.

In type 2 diabetes, the pancreas will still produce insulin, but the body has become “insulin resistant”. This means that the body is not fully able to utilize insulin to the best of its capacity. Some patients with type 2 diabetes do not need to take insulin, as they can regulate their blood sugar levels with healthy lifestyle and diet choices. However, many Americans that are at a later stage of type 2 diabetes will need insulin supplementation in the form of Humulin to help regulate their body’s blood sugar levels.

What are the Side Effects of Humulin?

There are a few side effects of Humulin; always consult your doctor if you begin to experience an increase in the severity of these symptoms:

  • Injection site rashes or reactions. This can include irritation, bruising, pain, and redness. It also may include something called lipodystrophy, or a thickening of the skin at the injection site.
  • Itching, rash, weight gains, and swelling of the feet and hands.
  • Low Potassium signs: irregular heartbeat, heart palpitations, weakness, and muscle cramps
  • Symptoms of low blood sugar: this may manifest in symptoms such as tremor, confusion, seizures, dizziness, hunger, nausea, weakness, or trouble concentrating. Fast heartbeat, blurred vision, and tremors may also occur.

Humulin Prescription Assistance

The Rx Helper is a full-service prescription assistance program that helps facilitate the enrollment of thousands of Americans. We can provide uninsured and under-insured Americans their Humulin prescription for little to no money by working with drug manufacturers and health care providers. If you demonstrate financial need, or you are uninsured or under-insured give the Rx Helper a call at (877) 767-3296, or click here to visit our contact page.

Need Help Paying for Medications to Treat Pulmonary Hypertension?

Need Help Paying for Medications to Treat Pulmonary Hypertension?

Every year, hundreds of thousands of people deal with the symptoms of pulmonary hypertension. People around the age of 75 or older are at risk for this condition. But, it can affect people of a younger age group. This condition is also more prevalent in women than in men. Year after year, people suffer from this illness. Doctors often prescribe medications to treat pulmonary hypertension. But, it’s not always easy for people to get medicine and treatment that they need. This is commonly due to the price of prescription meds.

What is Pulmonary Hypertension?

This condition is a type of high blood pressure. It impacts the arteries which go to the lungs and heart. It usually affects the right side of the heart. There are various groups of pulmonary hypertension:

Group 1 – Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH)

Group 2 – Pulmonary Hypertension (caused by left heart disorders)

Group 3 – Pulmonary Hypertension (caused by lung diseases)

Group 4 – Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension (caused by chronic blood clots)

Group 5 – Pulmonary Hypertension (caused by other disorders, i.e. blood disorders or kidney disease)

Each group has its own causes and symptoms. But, there are medications to treat pulmonary hypertension in its various forms.

Signs and Symptoms of Pulmonary Hypertension

You may not actually see any sign of this condition for quite some time. In fact, it may be months or years before you notice any of these symptoms. But, common signs of this blood pressure problem include:

  • Fatigue
  • Chest pain
  • Fainting
  • Dizziness
  • Heart palpitations
  • Swelling of ankles and legs
  • Increased speed of the heartbeat
  • Decreased appetite
  • Shortness of breath

Of course, symptoms may vary. Some may only occur as later symptoms while others may be seen as early signs of pulmonary hypertension. But, when any of these symptoms are noticed, you should seek medical attention as soon as possible.

Treating Pulmonary Hypertension

In some extreme situations, a doctor may recommend one of two surgical procedures to help treat pulmonary hypertension. Some people may have to get a lung and/or heart transplant. This is especially for those who have pulmonary arterial hypertension because of lung disease. In other instances, a person may need an atrial septostomy. During this procedure, the surgeons will create a space between the left and right sides of the heart. This reduces the pressure in the heart.

In less severe cases, Your doctor may provide you with a couple of different options for medications to treat pulmonary hypertension. Some of these options may include Letairis, Tracleer, Opsumit, or Cialis. Doctors may also suggest specific dietary and exercise routines that you can use to improve this condition.

Getting Medications to Treat Pulmonary Hypertension

If your doctor prescribes you some medications to treat pulmonary hypertension, it’s important to know which one would help you most. You can certainly live a fulfilling life if you have this condition. But, some treatment methods may work better than others for you. Of course, it depends on the severity of your condition.

What if your doctor does suggest a specific medication? What if it’s something a little out of your price range? Unfortunately, this happens really often. Because of the high cost of medication, some people aren’t able to afford the medical help that they need. But, that doesn’t have to be your story!

Here at The RX Helper, we provide prescription assistance to those who need it. Our program works with you, the patient, and various health care providers to make sure you get what you need. So, if you need medications to treat pulmonary hypertension, contact The RX Helper today! You can also visit our website to find out what medications we help with. There’s no need to worry about the cost of treatment. Just contact us today!

See If You Qualify For Prescription Assistance





captcha